Business

We need to unplug emails on pointless business hours


Imagine buying a bath full of peanut butter ice cream filled with sugar շ Find a message on the label: “Top Ten Tips to Lose Weight”.

If you think there may be a tip. “Give up peanut ice cream,” you do not think, like Tim Cook, the head of Apple.

Apple last week announced Soon his iPhones will have a “powerful tool” called Focus to better control the flow of snow և ping snow, which can make both focus and relaxation impatient. Users will be able to distort Twitter if they are busy at work on weekends or turn off work emails.

Or they could have done something more effective. Turn off the distracting device immediately or delete the programs that distract it. Of course, Apple would rather not do this because it makes money from both its App Store and iPhones. But you can see why it seems like it’s doing something to suppress digital noise.

Exhausting, constantly working culture was a problem before the epidemic, after which it deteriorated significantly.

Burn Jennifer Moss, a U.S. labor expert who co-authored a survey of workers in 46 countries last year, says in the midst of a “burning epidemic.” Many said that the work was getting worse, he said wrote: In the Harvard Business Review. As one of the respondents said. “E-mail Posts start at 5am. They do not end at 30 until 22 in the evening, because they know you have nowhere else to go. For single people who do not have a family, it is worse because you can not say. “I have to go take care of my children.”

Those words are substantiated official statistics In the UK, showing that people working from home last year paid an average of six hours of unpaid overtime per week, compared with 3.6 hours for those who never worked.

Taking homework into account is to maintain post-election blockades, in part because many employees want it, which is a concern. Long working hours kill hundreds of thousands of people every year, which is a turning point in the global health organization to study he said last month. It turns out that working more than 55 hours a week can be risky.

It is not uncommon for governments around the world to be under intense pressure to give workers the right to turn off something that has long been considered dubious news.

This is spreading faster than one might think, not just in the workforce of white, white collars. Police in the Australian state of Victoria recently won the right to turn off their employee hours later The association said It was the first deal of its kind for a law enforcement agency. The association says that people “did not feel sick, that they were on duty 24/7”, “they needed a chance to rest”. After too many working hours, the messages were small or could easily have been waiting.

Ireland passed the Code of Conduct in April on the right to secede, and Canada is doing the same.

This is good. The fear that such measures will stifle employers’ flexibility is exaggerated. “We are not talking about nine-fifths,” said Andrew Pike, research director at Prospect UK, which is seeking secession. “It does not mean that people will say, ‘5.0 is 5.02, so I’m not going to reply to that email.’ It does not mean a blanket, a one-size-fits-all approach is needed. This is not what happened in France, where a law has been in place for more than four years that requires companies with more than 50 employees to negotiate agreements on how to turn off the best.

The employees of the French telecommunication company Orange do not have to answer work messages on weekends, weekends or evenings, or during training, the spokesman said. Employees who have returned from vacation at other companies can spend a whole day missing without having to deal with clients or internal meetings, says Alex Sirius, head of France’s international division. FO-Com: trade union

Siriis says not all secessionist policies are perfect. “It depends on the will of the CEO,” he told me last week. Success also depends on the fact that employees և managers just talk to each other, he added, և used common sense, or common sense. In any case, the possibility of disconnection has always made a lot of sense, never more than now.

pilita.clark@ft.com:

Twitter: @pilitaclark:





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