Business

Biden is approaching the moment of truth


There was always a clash between Biden’s therapist Jo Joe Biden’s change agent և. Healing America meant uniting the bipartisan charm he had placed in the Senate for 36 years. Changing America means bypassing the Republican Party, which does not intend to give it legislative victories.

To manage means to choose. In the coming days, Biden will have to decide which of his two characters is more important. He could have allowed his agenda to stop the judge from searching for a bleak bipartisan past. Or he may leave the vacancies in Washington in favor of passing bills. It is a measure of the tension between the two Bidens that we can not yet be sure which way he will turn.

Feelings of emotional relief following the ouster of Donald Trump led to too many early rulings on the nature of Biden’s presidency. There were dozens of comparisons between Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon John Onson. As time went on, the negotiations with the Republicans gained that Barack Obama had found so useless, the early excitement gave way to growing anxiety. Last week, Senate Republicans killed any hope of a bipartisan commission investigating the January 6 uprising. The six Republicans who voted for it did not overcome the looting enough. All 50 Republican senators are ready to vote against the bills to secure them The American electoral system,

Their opposition goes beyond the usual partisanship. A group of the world’s leading scholars of democracy, including Francis Fukuyama, Pippa Norris and Robert Putnam, published “Statement of ConcernThis week about the turmoil in the US electoral system. They wrote: “Our democracy is in grave danger.” “History will judge what we do now.”

Biden clearly agrees. America’s right to vote “has been attacked with unbelievable force I have never seen before.” he saidThe stakes are much higher than whether he can work out his “better build” agenda, although this is also now in doubt. Failure to pass electoral reforms will make him the last president to be elected according to nationally agreed rules. Most worryingly, many Republican states are passing laws that would allow legislators to oversee the return of their electoral college.

The clash between the two Bidens reaches the Senate filibuster. This was the tool with which the Republican senators overthrew the January 6 commission and will work again to stop the electoral reforms. That’s what southern senators used to perpetuate slavery before the US Civil War of 1861, to defend Jim’s Crow racial discrimination after the defeat of the South. Philibaster does not appear anywhere in the US Constitution. The decisive vote of Vice President Kamala Harris, plus 50 Democrats, would require dismantling it and paving the way for a simple majority vote. This is how other democracies work. Filibuster is a series of American exclusivity that has passed its sales date.

Biden must decide whether he cares more about preserving that relic of the “lost cause” of the South than about securing the future of American democracy. For many of Biden’s allies, this is a no-brainer. There are two obstacles to it. The first is the center-right Democrats, mostly West Mancin from West Virginia, and Kirsten Sinema from Arizona, a small company. Mancin says he believes there are “10 good people” among Republicans to cross the 60-vote threshold. The evidence is against him. Mancin also says he is “not ready to destroy our government” by erasing the filibuster. His argument goes back to the front. By blocking change, the Fiberster threatens US democracy. It is no small irony that the Republicans used it to torpedo what was the worst attack on US democracy in peacetime since the early 1930s.

Biden’s second obstacle is himself. The great leaders of the two parties, from Roosevelt to Reagan, embody the change of the country’s era. Half of Biden is stuck in a romantic bond with a bipartisan age that no longer exists! He may agree with a small group of Republicans on the reduced infrastructure bill. Ditto is a project project for his families

No deals are made on maintaining US democracy. It is tempting to say that Biden is taking risks in a growing presidency like that of Bill Clinton. But that would be a wrong analogy. None of Biden’s Democratic predecessors faced a dilemma comparable to what he faces today. For everything to remain the same, Biden’s most precious desire, everything must change.

edward.luce@ft.com:



Source link

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button